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Free 20-minute coaching sessions -- limited time offer

Are you having trouble moving forward on your dissertation and wondering what it's like to work with a dissertation coach? Are you unsure what a dissertation coach does and how a coach could assist you to make significant and sustained progress to your degree?

Now you can experience the benefits of working with a coach through a free 20-minute coaching session. Find out for yourself if working with a dissertation coach is the answer for you.

For the next two weeks Jayne London, my associate in The Academic Ladder, is offering complimentary 20-minute dissertation coaching sessions. This is a fantastic opportunity for you. Read what other graduate students have said about working with Jayne:


The suggestions you made earlier this week made my work come together perfectly. It probably saved me three to five days or more of wheel spinning and over-planning.
Dee McGraw, doctoral candidate, Emory University



Jayne has enabled me to eradicate old, ineffective ways of working and develop new empowering habits. I have never felt as motivated to complete my dissertation.
Aimee Cox, doctoral candidate, University of Michigan



I heard back from my advisor today. He loved the chapters I sent him and has given me the go ahead to schedule the defense. Interestingly, he liked some of the writing that I just completed the most.
Unnamed, University of Wisconsin



When I became a Ph.D. candidate I lost my zest for the entire process and had been procrastinating on getting started writing. Jayne has encouraged me to finish by finding a way to just do a little writing each day.
DeAunderia Bryant-Day, doctoral candidate, University of Michigan



Contact Jayne at Jayne@AcademicLadder.com today!

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Here's what you do: Post in the comment section:
what you'd like to work on (if anything) over the holidays, and the maximum amount of time you'd like to spend on it daily. Please keep this time limit reasonable and low unless you're under huge deadline pressure -- in which case you don't need this challenge in order to get something done!

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Using …